Friday, January 28, 2011

UPDATED: Egyptian Protests, Violence Timeline and Links

UPDATED:  Egypt cabinet has formally resigned

                     Is Egypt Mideast's Poland? 

From Amb. John Bolton: Is Democracy coming to Egypt at last? 

                  Is the Muslim Brotherhood positioned to take over? 
      
                 Egypt: Live streaming video of unrest in Egypt at Reaganite Republican 

            A CNN photographer had her 'Camera Smashed'

                Egyptians demand a better life

Instapundit points out that Egypt protests show George W. Bush was right about freedom in the Middle East

Dr. Michael Youssef who was born in Egypt will appear on several CNN programs between 5pm and 10pm tonight.


Now, I don't know who is in the right or wrong - the Egyptian government or the Egyptians - but I do hope that this violence stops.  It may be a combination of both.  I do know that there has been Christian persecution and Christians have also been targets of violence more prevalently in recent times in Egypt.  Unfortunately, these violent protests could cause a spike in our oil prices.  I am really hoping and praying that this violence stops soon.  Mubarak does seem like a tyrant since he has ordered ElBaradei to be under house arrest.



Here is the updated timeline from CNN:
Updated 6:15 p.m. (0115 in Egypt)] President Mubarak's announcement that he was going to dissolve the government Saturday did not sit well with some protesters.
"Mubarak just blamed the government. We will continue our demonstrations until we get our full demands. We want him to leave. His time is over," said Ahmed, a 19-year-old law student demonstrator in Central Alexandria's Raml Square.
"We are one of the richest Arab countries and we want to live. Let a new government form but if we don't get what we ask for, we will go back to the streets again and again," said Mohammed, a 20- year-old student.
[Updated 5:45 p.m. (0045 in Egypt)] Protesters in the streets of Cairo are calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to leave, chanting in unison "we don't want him." The people in the streets represent all walks of life, from young people to families with children, CNN's Frederik Pleitgen reports.
[Updated 5:31 p.m. (0031 in Egypt)] Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak says he has asked the government to resign so he can appoint a new government Saturday. He gave no indication that he would step down or leave the country.
[Updated 5:27 p.m. (0027 in Egypt)] President Hosni Mubarak said he is "on the side of the people" and vowed to take steps to guarantee the rights and freedom of Egyptians, develop job opportunities and to "stand by the poor."
He said early Saturday he sees a fine line "between freedom and chaos" and that he would work to secure both freedom and security in Egypt.
"I assure you that I'm working for the people and giving freedom... as long as you're respecting the law," he said.
"I am absolutely on the side of the freedom of each citizen and at the same time I am on the side of the security of Egypt, and I would not let anything dangerous happen that would threaten the peace and the law and the future of the country."
[Updated 5:16 p.m. (0016 in Egypt)] President Hosni Mubarak is expected to speak soon, state-run Nile TV reports. Mubarak has not made any public appearances today.
[Updated 5:09 p.m. (0009 in Egypt)] It's just after midnight in Egypt and people are still milling about the streets in defiance of a government curfew, but activity has calmed, CNN's Frederik Pleitgen reports. Riot police appear to have withdrawn from the streets of Cairo and Alexandria after several hours of confrontation with protesters, and in their place the Egyptian Army has taken up presence, guarding government buildings.
State-run media reports that an "important statement" will be given later Friday in Egypt.
[Updated 4:58 p.m. (2358 in Egypt)] Thirteen people have died and 75 were injured in Suez, Egypt, Nile TV reported Friday, citing medical sources.
[Updated 4:51 p.m. (2351 in Egypt)] U.S. stocks plunged Friday - with the Dow industrial average falling 166 points, its largest loss since November, and the Nasdaq exchange losing 3% of its value - as investors grew nervous about political unrest in Egypt.
[Updated 4:35 p.m. (2335 in Egypt)] As public protests against the Mubarak regime spread from Cairo to New York City, Egyptian-American activists on Friday called on the Obama adminstration to back the "Lotus Revolution" to oust the authoritarian ruler. They also called on President Hosni Mubarak's government to end its purported practices of detentions, torture and "extrajudicial killings."
[Updated 4:00 p.m. (2300 in Egypt)] An iReporter visiting Egypt shot this videofrom his hotel room of demonstrators swarming three Army vehicles as they drove down the street.
[Updated 3:52 p.m. (2252 in Egypt)] The United States will review its aid to Egypt based on what is happening there now, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said Friday.
[Updated 3:31 p.m. (2231 in Egypt)] Egyptian military officials have cut short their talks at the Pentagon to head back to northern Africa, according to Gen. James Cartwright, vice chairman of the U.S. joint chiefs of staff. Their meetings with their U.S. military counterparts had been scheduled to continue through Wednesday.
[Updated 3:20 p.m. (2222 in Egypt)] The White House has been in touch with the Egyptian government but U.S. President Barack Obama has not spoken with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said in a briefing.
"We are deeply concerned about the images and events we see in Egypt today. We monitor those events closely; the security personnel need to refrain from violence, protesters should refrain from violence," he said.
"The legitimate grievances that have festered for quite some time in Egypt have to be addressed by the Egyptian government immediately, and violence is not the response. Space has to be created for meaningful dialogue that addresses those very legitimate grievances."
[Updated 2:56 p.m. (2156 in Egypt)] The building housing the offices of the National Democratic Party, Egypt's ruling party, was burned and ransacked by demonstrators in Cairo on Friday, Nile TV is reporting. A CNN source saw the building burning.
[Updated 2:52 p.m. (2152 in Egypt)] CNN's Steve Kastenbaum spoke with a former U.S. ambassador to Morocco and a Mideast adviser to several presidential administrations about the conditions that led to these demonstrations and where they might spread. 
[Updated 2:41 p.m. (2141 in Egypt)] A reporter for the BBC was bloodied but returned to the air, bandage in place. 
[Updated 2:25 p.m. (2125 in Egypt)] Delta Airlines tells CNN it will have a flight departing Cairo on Saturday and then suspend service to the Egyptian capital indefinitely as a result of the civil unrest.
[Updated 2:21 p.m. (2121 in Egypt)] Alexis Madrigal, a senior editor at The Atlantic, published late Thursday what is purported to be a guide to Egyptians on how to protest on Friday. The pamphlet includes strategies for taking over government buildings and diagrams showing how to fend off riot police. Read Madrigal's report and see how the pamphlet looks here. a
[Updated 2:03 p.m. (2103 in Egypt)] The U.S. State Department has issued a travel alert regarding the unrest in Egypt. It cites disrupted travel between cities and the government's interruption of internet and cell phone service. "Given this situation, the Department of State urges U.S. citizens to defer non-essential travel to Egypt at this time and advises U.S. citizens currently in Egypt to defer non-essential movement and to exercise caution," the alert states.
[Updated 1:39 p.m. (2039 in Egypt)] Several high-ranking Egyptian military officials were in the Pentagon on Friday for a previously scheduled visit, CNN's Chris Lawrence reports. They're attending the annual U.S.-Egypt Military Cooperation Committee meetings to discuss military training, security assistance and defense industrial cooperation.
[Updated 1:33 p.m. (2033 in Egypt)] A pair of CNN iReporters sent impressive video of demonstrators forcing riot police to retreat across the Kasr Al Nile Bridge. 
[Updated 1:25 p.m. (2025 in Egypt)] The Egyptian government has ordered cell phone companies to shut down service in selected areas, Vodafone says, adding that it is obliged by law to comply with the order.
[Updated 1:19 p.m. (2047 in Egypt)] Demonstrators in Cairo surrounded a military vehicle, but they were cheering the army, a respected institution in Egypt.

Weasel Zippers reports that Mubarak asks cabinet to resign
Maggie's Notebook posted Mohamed Elbaradei under Cairo arrest
American Perspective posted that Egyptians were hosed down during prayers
TOTUS posted on Chaos in Egypt 
Nonsensible Shoes posted Dictator watch: Egypt on the brink
Virtual Mirage posted Crisis in Egypt & Social Media 
Gateway Pundit has updated that the President of Egypt says "I Will Not Allow Escalating Violence" 
If you know of anymore links please let me know and I will post them. 



2 comments:

bluepitbull said...

This problem needs to be reined in quickly. I fear that the current regime in the U.S. is so impotent that a conservative president will again be handed the problem later.

Amusing Bunni said...

Hi Teresa, thanks for this informative post. Of course o couldn't be bothered about it until 5 days in, when he calls and lectures mubarak for 1/2 hour! I'm sure that will go over very well!
Glad we don't live there, have a fun weekend.