Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Call and E-Mail Pelosi-Save American Troops Lives!!!!

I am encouraging all people who visit my site to call Nancy Pelosi and make your voices be heard so that the Abu-Graib abuse photos are not released for the public to view them. These photos will do absolutely no good!!! These photos will incite violence against our troops and cause them grave harm. These abuse photos must be stopped from entering the publics viewing eyes. Let us do everything possible to keep our troops safe.Here is Pelosi's contact information:Speaker Nancy Pelosi
http://speaker.house.gov/contact

Office of the Speaker
H-232, US Capitol
Washington, DC 20515
(202) 225-0100

Thank You and God Bless!!!

11 comments:

Kyle R. Cupp said...

Teresa,

What particular practices that took place of Abu Ghraib do you consider to be abusive?

Teresa said...

Naked prisoners being stacked up on a pile while photos were taken.

Rape and sexual abuse

Savage beatings and Prisoners being forced to retrieve their food from toilets

Kyle R. Cupp said...

Two follow-up questions:

1. Was the nudity by itself abusive?

2. Would you support the use of any of these abusive practices if you believed their use could save lives?

Teresa said...

How could the nudity save lives?

Kyle Cupp said...

Teresa,

Interrogators have sometimes stripped a person of his clothing in order to compel the person to talk. Being naked often gives one a sense of helplessness, embarrassment, or fear. You might, for example, have a terrorist who is withholding life saving information, information that the interrogators think they might be able to obtain from him if they can soften his will by removing his clothing.

I am surprised you ask this question, Teresa, for the removal of clothing was one of the techniques approved by Donald Rumsfeld – one of the previous administration’s “enhanced interrogation techniques” you have defended. I am led to wonder if you really know what the techniques are that you have advocated as morally acceptable.

Anyway, do you have answers to the two follow-up questions I posed above?

Teresa said...

We were talking about the nudity at Abu Graib not the enhanced interrogation techniques.

On your blog I have given various examples of enhanced interrogation techniques so YES, I do know and understand about enhanced interrogation techniques.

It depends what you mean by nudity by itself. It depends on the circumstance whether nudity is abusive or not. If a person is just sitting or standing and is nude than it would not be considered abusive but if a people are piled naked just for the pleasure of soldiers to taunt them and take photographs than Yes that is wrong.

If a naked person is just standing or sitting in a cell and no harm is coming to them than Yes I would find it permissable if the focus or primary goal was to gain information to save American lives.

Kyle Cupp said...

You asked how nudity could be used to save lives, hence my move to the interrogation techniques.

Thank you for answering my questions. If I understand you correctly, you believe that forcing someone to be naked is not in itself abusive or in itself wrong.

Moving on. You qualify "lives" with the adjective "American." Are Americans the only people who can force people to be naked? Are American lives the only lives that justify forced nudity?

Teresa said...

Sorry didn't get back to you til now. I normally get a message saying an additional comment occurred and that didn't happen.I thought since we were talking about Abu Graib and the War on terror that I would just reference American lives.

I do believe all lives regardless of American or not are worth being saved. I believe any person from any country can use nudity as a method to save people's lives.

Kyle Cupp said...

Thanks for the response. I've been meaning to raise the following question to you for a while, and now seems like a fitting time. From what I understand, and I may be incorrect, the people we've used these interrorgation techniques on were not at the time officially proven to be guilty. They were, at most, suspected of terrorism. In any case, to use these techniques (nudity, stress positions, water-boarding, etc.) legitimately, do we first need to prove that the person we are using them on is guilty? If so, what proof would suffice?

Teresa said...

I don't think that we need to prove that they are terrorists like in a court of law(beyond a reasonable doubt) to have sufficient cause to use these techniques to gain information in order to save lives.

I would guess that the U.S. military has a set of guidelines to go by in order to weed out the innocent people from the suspected terrorists.

Kyle R. Cupp said...

Understand, then, that if the U.S. doesn't have to prove guilt, then neither does any other country. You would have no basis to object if another country used these techniques against our soldiers merely after saying that they were guilty and that using them would save lives.